April 2018 • Volume 17, Number 1
Image looking down on Bronzini broodstock, also known as European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), swimming in a tank at IMET's Baltimore lab. Photograph, Nicole Lehming
Nicole Lehming
Thirty years ago, Maryland looked as though it might get hooked on finfish aquaculture. But while oysters have arrived as an aquaculture species, and clams now grow in the coastal bays, Maryland no longer has any finfish farms. Its lone shrimp farm departed for warmer pastures. That could change soon.   more . . .
Yonathan Zohar, who focuses on marine and aquaculture biotechnology, feeds fish in IMET‘s aquaculture center. Photograph, Rona Kobell
Rona Kobell
Baltimore scientists have figured out how to grow an aquaculture industry. And it starts with silencing a protein called "dead end" to make sterile fish.   more...
Image of 3 striped bass swimming in a giant tankwith gravel and rocks on the bottom. Photograph, Will Parsons
Will Parsons
So, why have we ceded a Chesapeake Bay menu favorite to land-locked states like Tennessee and Kentucky?   more...
See where Marylanders and Virginians raise oysters and clams, and where early farmers planted them.   more...
Bringing together aquaculture entrepreneurs, researchers, regulators, and extension agents.   more...
See what species are growing where, in the Chesapeake Bay and coastal bays and beyond.   more...
Meet the four graduate students selected for this year's fellowship focusing on marine policy issues.   more...
Rona Kobell has joined as science writer and editor; Taryn Sudol is the new Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative coordinator.   more...
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